ASBC Beer Color and Turbidity

ASBC Color

The ASBC Beer Color scale has a range of approximately 1 to 11 units, with the more yellow, pale worts at the low end of the scale and the redder color of dark worts, beers and caramels at the upper end of the scale.

The industry reference method for ASBC Beer Color and Turbidity Is:

ASBC Beer-10 Color of Beer Part A. Spectrophotometric Color Method available from ASBC – American Society of Brewing Chemists, affiliated with AACC – American Association of Cereal Chemists, St. Paul, MN USA www.scisoc.org/aacc. Continue reading

Color and haze measurement of fruit drinks and carbonated beverages

FAQ: “I have worked with a company measuring the color of sports drinks. Now this company is interested in fruit drinks and also in carbonated soft drinks. Have you worked with these types of beverages? Any advice or recommendations?”

Fruit drinks contain:

  • water
  • corn sweeteners
  • may contain some fruit juice or fruit solids
  • flavors (oil emulsions)
  • may have clouding agent which is usually citric acid. Putting in a clouding agent to create a hazy appearance is a marketing decision which depends on the consumer association with the type of drink.

In a fruit drink, whether there is any natural fruit juice or not, the appearance of haze can be created by the presence of oil flavor emulsions and/or clouding agents such as citric acid. These are added on purpose to create a hazy appearance in some flavors of fruit drinks such as pineapple, lemonade, grapefruit and guava where the consumer expects some scattering.

For other fruit drink flavors such as apple, cream soda or grape the consumer does not have the expectation of a hazy appearance and no additional clouding agents are added.HunterLab can measure both lot-to-lot color and haze (or no haze for clear drinks) inherent in different fruit drinks.

If the beverage is carbonated (a separate source of scattering), it should be decarbonated to remove the carbonation as an unnecessary cause of scattering (independent of color) and measurement variation.To de-carbonate the beverage, place the liquid sample in a sonicator (there are a number available but I have seen a Branson Sonicator in successful use in the lab) that breaks up the carbonization by bombarding with Ultrasound for 60 seconds. Some care has to be taken that the carbonated beverage be placed in a container at least twice the volume of the beverage because when the ultrasound pummels the carbonization, the release of carbon dioxide gas can effervesce suddenly.

Another low-tech option to decarbonization is to place an air hose from the normal lab air supply into the beverage and gently run the air for about 4 minutes. The slow stream of air bubbles break up the carbonization gradually.

Carbon Blackness [My], Jetness [Mc], Undertone [dM] and Tint Strength [T]

“Carbon black, also called charcoal black lamp black, pigment black, soot or black carbon, is a fine particle carbon pigment obtained as soot from the incomplete combustion of many different types of organic materials, such as natural gas, or oil. Carbon black is usually a fine, soft, black powder. It is very stable and unaffected by light, acids and alkalis. It is commonly used in printing and lithograph inks and in Chinese ink sticks. In industry, carbon black is used as a filtration material and a filler /pigment in coatings, rubber, plastics, paints, carbon paper, and crayons. Continue reading

Is it possible to create ASTM traceable haze standards above 30%?

The current, available ASTM D1003 Haze Standards have nominal Haze% values of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 with air (transparent solids) or the transmission cell filled with DI water being 0 (transparent liquids). Here are some thoughts on further options. Continue reading

Can the color of Fresh Spaghetti Sauce be measured with Tomato Scores?

FAQ: “We have another question. Our current Standard for Fresh Spaghetti Sauce is to Run on the TK setting.

It appears as if the Product is Rather orange compared to our Crushed tomato product which is run on the TS setting resulting in a lower color.

What do you believe is the proper setting for Spaghetti Sauce?

The other thing I noticed is That the Calibration record does not have a TK result documented.” Continue reading

SPC Results for Diagnostic Didymium Filter Test

FAQ: “We take the results from the Didymium Filter Test on our HunterLab ColorQuest XT and plot them in an SPC chart over time to look at trends. We are seeing the 430 and 570 nm filters slowly decrease. Can you help us understand what may be occurring?” Continue reading

Do you know what Molten Color is?

FAQ:”A client is asking me to measure something they call “Molten Color’. Do you have any information on this? Do Hunterlab instrument have a function for this color?” Continue reading

Using ASCII Export on Multiple Jobs

Can you use the Automatic ASCII Export feature on more than one Job so that each Job exports to a separate file?

Providing everything is setup correctly within the EasyMatch QC software, it is possible to use the Automatic ASCII Export feature on more than one Job and to have each Job export to a different file. To make sure this is setup properly each Job must be saved once the ASCII Export configuration has been set. For more information on setting up the ASCII Export please see our blog note here.

ASCII Export Configuration

Once you have designated the file name to be used in the ASCII Export Configuration screen make sure you go to File/Save Job. This will save your ASCII Export Configuration settings to your Job. You can then create a new Job, or open a Job and go to Options/ASCII Export/Configure and use a new file name as the designated location. When you are finished go to File/Save Job to save the configuration. This can be done for as many Job files as you need. Just be certain once you designate the export file name and location in Options/ASCII Export/Configure to save the Job by going to File/Save Job.